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Fudge Stripe Cookies (about 25)

I originally shared this recipe for my column on Serious Eats. Check out my ode to Ernie J. Keebler, for more photos too.

If you’d like to make a vegan version of these, simply replace the clarified butter with a neutral flavored oil like safflower. You can use any chocolate you like for the “fudge” but a sweeter, less dark chocolate tastes most authentic.

Fudge Stripe cookies and milk

Keebler Fudge Stripe Cookies
3 3/4 ounce all purpose flour, sifted
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 ounces corn syrup
1 1/2 ounce clarified butter (unsalted), melted or a neutral oil
1/2 ounce vanilla extract
additional flour for dusting
8 ounce chocolate, tempered

Preheat the oven to 350°F and have two parchment lined sheet pans ready.

Combine the flour, soda, corn syrup, clarified butter, and vanilla in a medium bowl. Use a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment to beat the mixture until a smooth dough forms. Use your hands to lightly knead the dough into a ball.

Wrap with plastic and refrigerate about 10 minutes. If you’re quite comfortable rolling doughs, you can skip the refrigeration and start rolling.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough to 1/4” thickness. Run an offset spatula or thin knife between the dough and the counter, to ensure it doesn’t stick in any places.

Use a fork to dock to dough all over to mimic the design stamped onto real Fudge Stripe Cookies.

Use a 3” cutter to stamp out as many cookies as you can, transferring them to the cookie sheet. Use the smallest round cutter you have (or a plastic coupling from a pastry bag) to cut a hole from the center of each cookie. Gather up these holes along with the remaining cookie scraps, knead together, reroll, dock and cut again.

Bake the cookies approximately 12 minutes, or until just lightly browned all over. Cool thoroughly.

Fudge Stripe Cookies in a tree

Gather the cookies into a stack. Throw away the used parchment and cover each cookie sheet with a fresh piece of parchment paper.

Temper the chocolate and transfer to a small bowl. You can use melted, untempered chocolate too, but you will have to store the finished cookies in the refrigerator.

Drop the cookies into the chocolate one at a time, polka dotted side up. Using your fingers, gingerly lift the cookies back out and transfer each to the clean parchment. You may notice a thin film of chocolate covering the hole in the center. You can break the film by blowing through the hole, as if you were blowing bubbles.

Once all of the cookies have been coated in chocolate on one side, transfer the remaining chocolate to a small pastry bag fitted with a very small, plain tip.

If you haven’t wrangled a pastry bag into submission before (or if you have and found it frustrating), these 12 tips for using a pastry bag will make the process mess and stress free.

Pipe five wide stripes over each cookie. It seems like they could use more stripes, but if you Google “Fudge Stripe” you’ll see that they really only have five!

If you’re using tempered chocolate, it will set up on its own in a few minutes. If you’re using melted chocolate, transfer the cookies to the fridge for about 5 minutes to solidify the chocolate.

After the chocolate sets, peel the cookies off the parchment and store in an airtight container. Cookies coated in untempered chocolate must be stored in the refrigerator.

Fork!

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Any questions?

Nov 17, 2011 · 10:56 AM

Stella, this recipe is spot on! Thank you for sharing it…my wife was just saying the other day that she wish she had a recipe for these. Now she can leave the others on the grocery store shelf.

 · Brooks at Cakewalker · cakewalker.blogspot.com

Nov 17, 2011 ·  1:40 PM

I love the store bought ones, so I know I would really enjoy your homemade version. When I first glanced at the post, I thought the post was to promote the store bought ones (your picture looks so much like them)-delighted to find a recipe for homemade here.

 · Tina@flourtrader · flourtrader.blogspot.com

Nov 17, 2011 ·  2:07 PM

Love the recipe, but I have a question: I’ve seen you mention that untempered chocolate needs to be stored in the fridge before. Why is that?

 · Kaitlin · whisk-kid.blogspot.com

Nov 17, 2011 ·  4:08 PM

You have read the collective minds of Keebler fudge stripped cookie lovers everywhere. Just the other day (as I was polishing off about 10 of these pre-packaged bad boys), I was wondering if I could make these myself. Turns out I can with this recipe. I think maybe I love you…

 · Angela @ Mind Over Batter · www.mind-over-batter.com

Nov 17, 2011 ·  5:55 PM

@Brooks, perfect timing! You’ll have to snap a pic and let me know how they turn out!

@Tina, I was really distraught I couldn’t figure out a way to give them a pattern like the real ones. Short of an expensive mold or specialty rolling pin, I just couldn’t figure it out. So I thought docking might suffice. I’m glad they fooled you, I was afraid they lacked that certain…elven magic.

@Kaitlin, you can pop untempered chocolate dipped things into the fridge to get them to set up (they usually won’t on their own, or if they do it could take several hours). But once they come to room temperature they tend to have a slightly tacky texture and melt on your fingers. I really should tackle a chocolate tempering post sometime to explain chocolate’s different fat types, melting points, etc, but when I think of writing such a huge block of straight up information, I go a little cross eyed.

@Angela, aw, I love you too! Holy crap, I loved these cookies when I was little. Whenever I make a copy cat recipe, I start by buying and sampling the original. Most things (Nutter Butters come to mind… aren’t as delicious as I remember, so I’m happy to have a substitute, but Fudge Stripes are still a pretty awesome cookie. Crisp. Not too sweet. A little dry. These are too, but I wont’ knock the original in a pinch. Thanks for stopping by!

Stella

Nov 19, 2011 ·  7:37 AM

I loved these cookies when I was growing up. These look amazing

 · Beth Michelle · bethmichelle.com

Nov 19, 2011 · 11:55 AM

@Beth Michelle, me too! I loved wearing them on my finger and nibbling my way around…

Stella

Nov 20, 2011 ·  7:30 PM

They look amazing…just like the store bought kind. I would be so proud to make something like this. Pat on the back for you!

 · Emily @ Life on Food · lifeonfood.blogspot.com/

Nov 21, 2011 ·  9:42 AM

@Emily, haha, thanks! It’s funny, the plain cookie really isn’t that great, but once they’re covered in chocolate, they’re perfect!

Stella

Jan 23, 2012 · 11:04 AM

Hi these look delish! Quick question, did you use light or dark corn syrup? Thanks

 · SK · 

Jan 23, 2012 · 12:00 PM

@SK, oooh, I hope you make a batch. I use light corn syrup.

Stella

Feb 25, 2012 ·  4:12 PM

I just made these cookies and they are delicious and so much like the store bought, but better! Quick question, I followed all your directions, but my yield was only 9 cookies. Any thoughts? I thought I used a 3” cookie cutter, I measured it to make sure.

 · Tracy · paleyellow.net

Feb 25, 2012 ·  9:51 PM

@Tracy, huh! It sounds like they may have been a little thick. I roll mine super thin, so that each (unbaked) cookie is only about 1/3 of an ounce. The cookie recipe yields 7.75 ounces of dough, so accounting for re-rolling the dough once and reusing the cut-out centers, you should definitely get quite a few more than 9. Though my count of 24 may be a little off; I’m making much larger batches at work and usually have to approximate the yield. I hope that helps!

Stella

Aug 13, 2012 ·  1:18 PM

I love these cookies. They are one of my very faves. So great that I no longer have to make do with the store bought.
Thanks for a Grand recipe.

 · Bev · 

Aug 14, 2012 · 11:22 PM

Oh, Bev, I hope you enjoy them! They’re really fun to make, although in my mind they should have more stripes (the real ones only have 5!).

Stella

Oct 09, 2012 ·  5:48 PM

It says 3 & 3/4 ounce of flour. Is this correct or is it cups

 · Sal · 

Oct 09, 2012 ·  5:59 PM

Hi Sal. The recipe is correct as is; it’s not a whole lot of flour, so I can understand your double take.

Stella

Nov 09, 2013 ·  2:03 PM

I made these yesterday…. they were delicious in spite of my moody oven that overcooked them. My batch made a lot less too… only 11 and that was rolling them quite thin. Was the cutter you used 3” in diameter or in circumference? I think next time I will use a smaller cutter and double the dough. Thanks for the recipe! =)

 · Charity · saygrrsewing.blogspot.com/

Nov 11, 2013 · 12:31 AM

Hi Charity! Aw, I’m glad they turned out even with a few snafus along the way. I use a cutter that’s 3” in diameter, but now that I think about it 1/4” may be a little thick. This is an older recipe, and I wasn’t always so good about my note taking and often wrote up the directions after the fact. I’m guessing I rolled them to something more like 1/8” which would account for my extra cookies. I’ll edit the recipe, thanks for bringing that to my attention!

Stella



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