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Reese's Cups · GF (20 peanut butter cups)

I originally shared this recipe for my column on Serious Eats. Read my Reese's Thesis for a comprehensive review of the peanut butter cup throughout human history. The recipe I posted on Serious Eats has more process photos and consolidates all of the directions into one page, so check it out here for more details if you ned ‘em.

homemade reese's peanut butter cups

Including complete tempering instructions is beyond the scope of this recipe, but if you’d like to learn, please check out my friend Emma’s tempering how-to article on the Kitchn.

You can absolutely skip tempering and simply use melted chocolate instead. In that case, you’ll have to store the finished candies in the refrigerator because untempered chocolate will not hold up at room temperature.

1/2 batch Peanut Butter "Nutella"
28 oz milk or dark chocolate chocolate, tempered

Fit a pastry bag with a large, plain tip. If you haven’t wrangled a pastry bag into submission before (or if you have and found it frustrating), these 12 tips for using a pastry bag will make the process mess and stress free.

Fill the pastry bag with the peanut butter “nutella” and set aside.

Arrange 28 cupcake liners on a sheet tray. Fill each with a half ounce of chocolate. Then use the pastry bag to pipe about three quarters of an ounce off filling directly into the center of each. This will force the chocolate away from the center and up the sides of each cup.

step by step peanut butter cup directions

Use a damp finger to gently pat down the “peak” of each peanut butter center. Top each with another half ounce of chocolate. Take the sheet pan in both hands a gently rap it against the counter to level the chocolate and dislodge any air bubbles.

If you’re using untempered chocolate, refrigerate the peanut butter cups until hardened, about thirty minutes. Tempered chocolate will harden on its own in a few minutes.

After the chocolate has set, peel each peanut butter cup free from the cupcake liners. Store in an airtight container with a piece of parchment or waxed paper between each layer. They will keep for about a month at room temperature or indefinitely in the fridge or freezer. Please remember, if you use untempered chocolate you must store the candies in the refrigerator at all times.

These are phenomenal chopped up and stirred into Banana or Chocolate ice cream. They also make a great mix-in for a Homemade Blizzard. If that’s how you’d like to use them, you can skip tempering.

Fork!

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Any questions?

Sep 16, 2011 ·  7:47 PM

Oh my word. I will die happy with a dozen of these in my tummy.

 · Charissa · www.colourfulpalate.com

Sep 16, 2011 ·  8:21 PM

These are absolutely beautiful and scrumptious!

 · The Chef Doc · www.thechefdoc.com

Sep 16, 2011 ·  8:30 PM

Those homemade cups look so pretty and perfect! Just like the store-bought ones…but even better and fresher ;D

 · Kathy · cupcakes-music-fashion.blogspot.com

Sep 16, 2011 · 10:53 PM

One of my favorites! I don’t make these nearly enough.

 · Evan Thomas · thewannabechef.net

Sep 16, 2011 · 11:11 PM

Peanut butter cups are my favorite! I have to make them before this year is over, yum!

 · Vicki @ WITK · wildeinthekitchen.blogspot.com

Sep 17, 2011 · 12:09 AM

Wonderful! thanks for the photographic procedure. That peanut butter is a terrific stuff. You can eat on it’s own or make it a flavor for a delish cake.

 · My Fudo · www.myfudo.com

Sep 17, 2011 · 12:39 AM

@Charissa, oh no, I hope you live with a tummy full of ‘em.

@The Chef Doc, thank you!

@Kathy, they are a intsy bit better…

@Evan, they should be a monthly ritual.

@Vicki, let me know if you do make ‘em. Would love to see how yours turn out,

@My Fudo, the filling is really nice whipped into buttercream. Good in so many ways!

Stella

Sep 17, 2011 ·  1:27 AM

Holy Peanut Butter!! Those look so perfect! My hubby didn’t believe that they were homemade at first! haha!

 · The Farmers Wife · www.the-farmers-wife.net

Sep 17, 2011 ·  4:23 AM

LOVE LOVE LOVE. Im not even sure what else to say about these beauties.

 · Beth Michelle · bethmichelle.com

Sep 17, 2011 ·  1:56 PM

I have a serious obsession with peanut butter cups. These are amazing!!

 · Christina · thiswomancooks.blogspot.com

Sep 17, 2011 · 11:20 PM

@The Farmers Wife, you know, I worried about that with these photos. They look a little too good. Just goes to show how far a cupcake liner will get you in life.

@Beth Michelle, thanks lady. I hope you make a batch sometime, they are pretty yumtastic.

@Christina, insider tip: they’re even better stirred into banana ice cream

Stella

Sep 18, 2011 ·  6:22 AM

stella, i made my own reeses’ cups a few weeks ago and now i see your wonderful trick with the tempered chocolate and piping in the filling. i sure will remember this for the next time!
greetings from germany, from a fellow pastry chef!

 · jennifer @poirier · fleurdupoirier.blogspot.com/

Sep 18, 2011 ·  9:26 AM

they look perfect! I absolutely love pb cups, I need to teach my girls how to make these!

 · Chef Dennis · www.askchefdennis.com

Sep 18, 2011 · 10:04 AM

PB + Chocolate = my FAVORITE combo Ever!
These came out so perfectly….I’ll def. have to try them!

 · spiceblogger · www.inthelandofspice.com

Sep 18, 2011 · 11:12 AM

These look so delicious. I can’t buy Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups here so at last I’ll be able to make them! Thanks for sharing.

 · Hester @ Alchemy in the Kitchen · www.alchemyinthekitchen.ie

Sep 18, 2011 · 12:55 PM

@Jennifer, all the way from Germany! Hello! I figured out this method because my favorite way to eat a Reese’s is to punch out the middle. By piping the filling straight into the center, it creates a weak spot on the bottom so you can punch your finger through!

@Dennis, it sounds complicated, but it’s actually a really easy process. Hope you whip up a batch with your girls.

@Spiceblogger, I know, right? You have to really look at them for a while to realize they’re not Reese’s Cups. Once you taste ‘em, the difference is clear, however.

@Hester, oh no!! No Reese’s Cups? Glad I could come to the rescue.

Stella

Sep 18, 2011 ·  2:05 PM

Congrats on top 9! This looks so yummy!

 · Dee Dee's Delights · deedeesdelights.blogspot.com

Sep 18, 2011 ·  5:22 PM

Congrats on Foodbuzz top 9!

 · Christine · christinespantry.blogspot.com

Sep 18, 2011 ·  7:47 PM

I am obessed with Reese’s and honestly, anything to do with peanut butter and chocolate. I even have a recipe for peanut butter iced coffee on our blog! These look delish!! Cannot wait to try them – thanks for sharing!!

 · Katie @ BloomEveryday · bloomeveryday.wordpress.com/

Sep 23, 2011 · 11:18 AM

Yeah, definitely going to have to surprise the fiance with these one day! Great article on Serious Eats too!

 · Peggy · mybflikeitsoimbg.blogspot.com

Sep 23, 2011 · 11:10 PM

@Peggy, thanks so much, I’m glad you enjoyed it! You should definitely whip up a batch for your fella, he’ll love ‘em (so they must be good?)!

Stella

Oct 12, 2011 · 11:18 AM

Wow, these look perfect! I will try these immediately!

 · Kyo · www.gardenofeli.com

Oct 12, 2011 · 11:25 PM

@Kyo, awesome! You’ll have to let me know if you give ‘em a shot!

Stella

Jan 16, 2012 ·  2:21 AM

What a clever way to put these together. I have made PB cups before, but they turn out more like PB balls and always look ugly. The cupcake liner gives the perfect edge and the method is genius. Love it

 · Ashley · 

Jan 16, 2012 · 10:55 AM

@Ashley, thanks! I was desperate to figure out how to make the perfect shape; half the fun is the way they look, huh? Hope you have a chance to make a batch of these next time.

Stella

Feb 29, 2012 · 11:07 AM

Should we use salted peanuts for the filling? Also, can I replace the peanut oil with canola oil? Thanks!

 · sara · 

Feb 29, 2012 ·  5:33 PM

@sara, I use salted peanuts, but you can use unsalted if you’d rather and adjust the salt yourself to taste. I wouldn’t recommend Canola oil, as I think it contributes an off-taste. If not peanut, go for something like safflower which has a neutral flavor profile.

Stella

Mar 01, 2012 ·  6:55 AM

Thanks! I want to make peanut butter cup eggs for Easter using candy molds. Any tips?

 · sara · 

Mar 01, 2012 · 12:16 PM

@sara, fabulous idea! I’m going to do a post on this for Serious Eats when it gets a bit closer to Easter, using silicon egg shaped molds. The trick is to paint your molds in about a 1/4” of chocolate. Either wait for the tempered chocolate to harden or refrigerate untempered chocolate until hard. Then fill each egg cup with the mixture and pat down until level using a damp finger. Finally cap the eggs with another layer of chocolate. Good luck, snap a few photos for me, I bet they’re adorable!

Stella

May 30, 2012 ·  9:58 PM

Any suggestions for the pb/ chocolate filling ratio for mini cupcake liners?

 · Lisa  · 

May 31, 2012 · 10:15 AM

@Lisa, oh “fun size” I see! I haven’t tried making those, but honestly, I’d say you can just eyeball it. I didn’t “measure” for the big cups until it came time to formalize the recipe, it’s easier than you’d think to intuit the proper amount. Maybe start with 2 teaspoons of chocolate in the bottom? Let me know if you make them and how they turn out!

Stella

Feb 13, 2013 · 12:14 AM

Hey Stella. I’ve got a tempering conundrum I’m hoping you can help me with. When I attempt to temper my chocolate, it seems to have been tempered correctly—it sets up in minutes and is totally rock hard. Looks glossy too. But in about 45 minutes, lo and behold it’s covered in cocoa butter bloom!! So frustrating. It’s STILL rock hard and snappy, but with a nasty beige bloom coat. How is this even possible? :S

 · Psyche1226 · 

Feb 13, 2013 · 10:33 PM

Hi Psyche1226! Most likely chocolate isn’t getting agitated enough (though perhaps you are!). It sounds like you’re controlling the temperatures just right, so keep on doing what you’re doing there, but try working the chocolate more. If you’re benching it, I’d say just go longer. If you’re stirring, I’d say to make sure you’re scraping the sides of the bowl and really working the whole mixture. Hope that helps and you see some more success soon!

Stella

Feb 14, 2013 ·  1:13 PM

Dang. Well, I don’t know what to do then, because I’m beating the crap out of it with a rubber spatula, CLEANING the sides of the bowl every couple strokes. I was hoping you knew some esoteric mystical chocolate master sensei secret that would explain everything. Ugghhh the chocolate just hates me.

 · Psyche1226 · 

Feb 14, 2013 ·  5:52 PM

Ah, bummer! I don’t know a ton about temper-troubleshooting, and that was my first/best guess. I’ll ask around and see if I can find some better answers for you!

Stella

Oct 19, 2013 · 12:39 PM

hi, I just tried your biscotti and now the Reese. Looks great. Thanks for sharing

 · hweehwee · 

Nov 24, 2013 ·  4:34 PM

Are these measurements US or UK ounces etc.?

 · tinker · 

Nov 24, 2013 ·  5:08 PM

Hi Tinker! I’m an American, so it’s all US ounces here. On a related note, I never use fluid ounces, so everything is by weight.

Stella

Feb 16, 2014 ·  9:04 PM

I made these “fun-size” the other day, half with milk chocolate and half with dark. I used 0.2 oz of chocolate for each the bottom and top and 0.3 oz of filling for each cup and it made about 50. I usually like dark chocolate but for this recipe I think I like milk better. The filling set up in the fridge so I rolled it into balls instead of using a piping bag which worked out really well. Great recipe thanks for sharing!

 · Alexandra · 

Feb 16, 2014 · 10:02 PM

Hi Alexandra! Aw, that does sound fun! I love the idea of mini-cups. Isn’t it funny? I prefer dark chocolate in general too, but milk chocolate is such a better match for this recipe. I think it’s about the way it matches up to our expectations of a commercial candy. I love that you were able to hand roll the filling, that’s awesome! Thanks for sharing.

Stella

May 05, 2014 ·  5:37 PM

Hi Psyche
I know that I’m more than a year late to comment, but in case you’re still interested: in my experience, that happens when ambient factors aren’t ideal. A few days ago, I was tempering a batch. Room temp was 22 C, I did everything right, yet the chocolate bloomed a little an hour later, because of very high humidity on that day (I was working near an open window). So if you can, use air conditioning not only to lower the air temp, but also to dry out the air, or a dehumidifier. I believe anything above 55% is too much for tempering, I even read somewhere that extremely high humidity can make melted chocolate seize in the bowl.

 · ceca · 

May 05, 2014 ·  5:40 PM

Thanks for bringing that up, Ceca. Even so many years later it is a great point and something to consider when working with chocolate. xo

Stella



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